May 22, 2019

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May 09, 2019 10:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time

https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190509005116/en/MEDIA-ADVISORY-Impressive-Lineup-Keynote-Speakers-2019

April 29, 2019 10:49 AM Eastern Daylight Time

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February 12, 2019 12:21 PM Eastern Standard Time

The IEEE Broadcast Technology Society will be hosting the ATSC 3 Roadshow at PBS TechCon 2019. BTS will be hosting the one-day course on the new ATSC 3 digital television (DTV) transmission system, taught by expert Gary Sgrignoli of Meintel, Sgrignoli, and Wallace, the noted digital TV transmission consulting firm. The Broadcast Technology Society will be offering the ATSC 3 Roadshow course on several dates in locations throughout the United States.
This course will develop a fundamental understanding of the ATSC 3 digital transmission system's Physical Layer, provide attendees with practical application ideas and update them regarding the progress of the spectrum repack and ATSC 3 deployment. Attending the IEEE Broadcast Technology Society's ATSC 3 Roadshow will earn attendees SBE credit towards re-certification and can facilitate preparation for the upcoming SBE ATSC 3 Specialist Certification exam.

Course Outline

Register Now

WHERE: Flamingo Las Vegas, 3555 South Las Vegas Boulevard, Las Vegas, Nevada 89109, United States

WHEN: Saturday, April 6, 2019 from 9:00am – 5:30pm (PST)

ABOUT BTS: The IEEE Broadcast Technology Society (BTS) is an International membership organization open to everyone in the broadcast technology industry. The BTS mission is to serve the needs of its members; to enhance their professional knowledge by keeping them informed of the latest research results and industry trends, and provide enriching educational and networking opportunities.

Follow IEEE BTS:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IEEEBTSociety
Twitter: https://twitter.com/IEEEBTSociety
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/groups/IEEE-Broadcast-Technology-Society-IEEE-4937489

TWEET THIS: The kick off for the BTS ATSC 3 Roadshow will be @ #TechCon19 in Las Vegas on Sat, April 6. You can register for the one day course @ https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/?eventid=2556266 #BTSATSC3Roadshow

Press, Event & Sponsorship Contact:
Margaux Toral
Society Promotions & Marketing Manager
IEEE Broadcast Technology Society
445 Hoes Lane
Piscataway, NJ 08854
732.981.3455
m.toral@ieee.org

IEEE offers a great Summer Camp program, Try Engineering Summer Institue for high school aged children with an interest in becoming future Engineers.  BTS is a proud Sponsor of this important program for the 2nd year!   The goal of the program is to spark enthusiasm in engineering and technology in the next generation of the problem-solvers and difference-makers, and position these innovators for long-term success in academics and in life.

Organized in two-week sessions each summer, on three dynamic college campuses across the United States, the TryEngineering Summer Institute unites students from around the world-- co-ed, between 12-17 years old -- to:

  • engage in hands-on design challenges
  • experience the work firsthand with behind-the-scenes tours with real-life engineers
  • discover not just what's happening today, but what's coming tomorrow, through conversations with renowned guest speakers and incredible Summer Institute counselors

Read the 2019 program brochure online

 

They begin with network design

Dec 20, 2018

COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS—The television broadcast technical plant is changing or has changed for many. The traditional baseband based serial digital interface (SDI) commonplace since the inception of digital television is being replaced by an IP-based infrastructure. The migration to an all-IP infrastructure brings several advantages, including:

  • Cost savings by using commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS) IT hardware. Enterprise routers and switches have enormous economies of scale compared to the broadcast world’s purpose-built, industry-specific infrastructure.
  • Greater system workflow flexibility. The inherent architecture flexibility provides for a change in workflow processes without a system re-wire commonly found in the baseband SDI plant. With a COTS Ethernet switch, high-capacity, non-blocking signal routing can be implemented in far less space than the traditional matrix SDI router.
  • Format and resolution agnostic. Enterprises and streaming video service providers already use COTS infrastructure for a wide variety of formats and resolutions, from 720p through 1080p at 60fps and 4k. The use of IT industry standards also enables the high levels of interoperability commonly found among COTS equipment manufacturers.
  • Simplified interconnection wiring. Installation costs are significantly reduced because less interconnection cabling means less labor. The SDI plant’s fixed signal path is replaced with a “star” architecture found in enterprise IT networks. System changes also are implemented by software configuration rather than facility re-cabling.

The use of an IP network in a broadcast facility has been commonplace for some time now. One example is the familiar RJ-45 Ethernet jack on many broadcast devices. Use of the IP network has been primarily for command and control, monitoring or file transfer.

But when an IP network is mentioned in the context of transporting real-time broadcast media, an instant lack of trust is often a common response. Many broadcast professionals are simply unable to accept the perceived risk involved for mission-critical content transmission. The “belt and suspenders” mindset of the broadcast engineer simply does not permit the perceived unreliable operation found in the IP environment. Reinforcement for this mindset is often obtained from one’s personal experience with the Internet.

ENABLING PROFESSIONAL MEDIA OVER MANAGED IP NETWORKS

To enable interoperability between system components from different manufacturers, the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) established the ST 2110 standard. SMPTE 2110 is considered an umbrella standard, or a family of individual functional standards, that allow for the transmission of uncompressed audio and video over an IP network.

Fig. 1: SMPTE 2110 Standard Diagram

Fig. 1: SMPTE 2110 Standard Diagram

SMPTE 2110 is a suite of standards for transmission of “professional media over managed IP networks.” Audio, video and ancillary data are treated as separate, uncompressed essence data streams. Individual standards focus upon functional components of the suite, such as video (ST 2110-20) or audio (ST 2110-30). Ancillary data may include captioning data (ST 2110-40) that is associated with the media essence streams. A unique feature of ST 2110 allows essence data streams to be sent or routed over different physical paths and re-assembled at a destination end point by the incorporation of a synchronization mechanism (ST 2110-10).

Several SMPTE standards incorporate established Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Request for Comments (RFC) provisions into the standards. Examples include the ST 2110-20 standard incorporating the IETC RFC #4175 for uncompressed video transmission and the ST 2110-10 system standard incorporating the IETF RFC #3550 Real Time Protocol (RTP). The IETF RFC’s are considered the “Bible” of IP networking.

It's important to make a couple of critical distinctions regarding the SMPTE ST 2110 standard. First, what is known as the public “Internet” is not the intended physical transport platform. By definition stated in the ST 2110 title, a “managed” IP network is the transport platform. A managed IP network is a private network that is built on private physical facilities or more likely a telco common carrier provided Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) network. Performance can be specified in a Service Level Agreement (SLA) to ensure reliable delivery of real-media content such as high-definition, uncompressed video. Differentiated services are utilized to meet and maintain a contracted Quality of Service (QoS).

In contrast, the public Internet is a maze of independent interconnected networks with no end-to-end performance coordination or governance. Thus, the term “best effort” is used to describe the QoS of the public Internet. This is simply not an appropriate network choice in which to implement SMPTE ST 2110.

THE CIA TRIAD OF CYBERSECURITY

The private nature of the physical network platform also becomes a first step in mitigating cybersecurity vulnerabilities. Nevertheless, ST 2110 is an IP-based data network, so the IT industry’s accepted security practices should be deployed in any implementation.

Fig. 2: The “CIA” Triad
 

Fig. 2: The “CIA” Triad

Network cybersecurity mitigation involves a number of individual steps or practices rather than one single step. Overall, the goal of network security is to meet the attributes defined by the “CIA Triad” as illustrated by Fig. 2. The triad is based upon the three attributes of: Confidentiality, Integrity and Availability. It should be noted that the phrase “AIC Triad” may also be used to avoid confusion with a US government agency of the same acronym.

Confidentiality refers to the ability of the network infrastructure to not allow disclosure of the data or information traversing the network infrastructure to any unauthorized user or host. Integrity refers to the ability of the network to ensure that the data has not been altered by an unauthorized user or host. And availability refers to the ability of the network infrastructure to ensure that resources are available only to authorized users or hosts.

Cybersecurity events such as a Denial of Service (DoS) attack or a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack target the availability attribute by impacting access to the network resources by legitimate users. A Man in the Middle (MITM) attack seeks to destroy the integrity attribute by altering the data or information traversing the network.

Industry best practices begin with network design as the first step in cyber-security threat mitigation. The network is segmented or layered into functional areas as dictated by the business case use, regulatory policy or organizational policy. Each layer or segment has unique use or purpose with an established security access policy. Inner layers are considered the core network segments and are the most secure.

The characteristics of an MPLS network provide an economical platform for ST 2110 implementation.

Other security attributes involve physical network infrastructure equipment protection from tampering through locked enclosures, cabinets or cages. Implementation of Ethernet switch port security is another capability that a managed switch offers to control what host device can be attached to a switch port. Packet filtering can be implemented by an Access Control List (ACL) to allow select host interoperability between network segments. The ACL filtering can be based upon several IP header fields such as addresses, protocol and port number.

Infrastructure equipment management should be implemented in an out-of-band manner. Out-of-band management also allows the use of the public Internet for accessibility implemented in a secure manner such as an encrypted Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection to the management network. This approach provides an air-gap between content transport network segments and the management network.

All of these outlined practices come together to define a secure network rather than complying with a single attribute. Cybersecurity can’t be ignored or left as an afterthought. At the end of the day, the broadcast engineer should have trust and confidence in a SMPTE ST 2110 network that is implemented as intended by the published standard utilizing established industry security practices.

Wayne M. Pecena is a IEEE BTS Distinguished Lecturer and Director of Engineering, Texas A&M University, KAM

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WAYNE PECENAIEEE BTSCYBERSECURITY

U FM & TV.

Fifth-generation (5G) mobile is venturing where no cellular technology has gone before—the centimeter and millimeter wave bands (3 GHz to 300 GHz). And for good reason—there’s virtually no room left in cellular’s traditional sub-3 GHz bands to add enough capacity to shoulder all the additional traffic that 5G technology will enable.

WiFi is just as congested. That’s why in 2014, the FCC relaxed its rules for the 5 GHz band, effectively giving some WiFi devices access to another 100 MHz of spectrum. But with 4G and 5G cellular both offloading some of their traffic to WiFi, that extra 100 MHz won’t go far.

Hence the need for a new, fundamentally different air interface, one that combines traditional radio frequency (RF) technology with visible light. Called Internet of Radio-Light (IoRL), this technology aggregates 5G Component Carriers in the unlicensed 60 GHz millimeter wave (mmWave) band and visible light communications (VLC) in the electromagnetic (EM) spectrum between 400 and 800 THz.  However, WiGig IEEE 802.11ad could equally well be used for the air interfaces with some slight modifications to the system architecture protocols.

This combination enables:

  • Throughput greater than 10 Gbps, making it a viable alternative to WiFi, fiber, and copper for providing high-capacity broadband service in offices, airports, apartment buildings, and other places where demand is the highest.
  • Latencies of less than 1 ms, which is fast enough for delay-intolerant applications such as Internet of Things (IoT) sensors and videoconferencing.
  • Location accuracy of less than 10 cm, making it a good fit for IoT applications such as tracking high-value assets inside buildings, or wayfinding in malls and convention centers.

These are the same places where cellular and WiFi will always struggle to keep up. For example, cement boards and the wire mesh in stucco are great for attenuating signals. Some building owners try to get around that problem by installing Long Term Evolution (LTE) Home eNodeB (HeNBs) to create a private, local-area cellular network. But that infrastructure is expensive, and getting mobile operators’ approval to use their scarce spectrum can take months.

Broadband Coverage as Ubiquitous as Light

IoRL avoids these limitations partly by leveraging the trend toward LED lighting in offices, apartment complexes and other commercial buildings. IoRL uses Remote Radio Light Heads (RRLH), which can be integrated with conventional LED lighting systems. So, during remodels and new construction, the IoRL network installation simply becomes part of the lighting installation rather than an extra step with additional expenses for labor and materials

IoRL also leverages lighting’s ubiquity since the dawn of civilisation. Unlike WiFi access points and HeNBs, lighting fixtures are in every part of a building—even stairwells, restrooms, parking garages, and elevators. That means IoRL automatically has coverage in all of those places.

The RRLH uses 5G’s multi-component carrier feature to aggregate the VLC and mmWave bands to provide more throughput than each technology could provide by itself. Figure 1 provides an overview of the RRLH and other components in an IoRL network. It also shows that mobile operators could use IoRL to offload some of their traffic by enabling interworking with their gNodeBs or to simply act as a 5G Radio Access Network direct interface to the Internet in the Home.

 

Figure 1. Overview of RRLH and other components in an IoRL network.
Figure 2. Illustrates the IoRL network layers: service, network function virtualization (NFV), software defined networking (SDN) and access.

The access layer has six RRLH controllers, each of which drives up to eight VLC and mmWave RRLH pairs. This architecture enables multiple-input, single-output (MISO) transmission on downlink paths, and single-input, multiple-output (MISO) on uplink paths. The downlink uses MISO diversity to improve reliability by leveraging multipath. For example, if a person accidently blocks one of the mmWave signal path, it’s likely that another mmWave signal and/or a VLC signal will be able to reach the user device. SIMO diversity is used on the uplink and benefits from the same man-made multipath environment in the reciprocal direction.

If all of the signal paths are blocked, IoRL still can maintain a connection by using Multi-Source Streaming (MSS) and Multi-Path TCP. This approach ensures that there’s another low-frequency, low-capacity WLAN path for continued communications and synchronization.

The Intelligent Home IP Gateway (IHIPG) provides additional features to maximize quality of service. For example, the IHIPG uses deep packet inspection to identify video streams. A video transcoding virtual networking function (VNF) can generate a lower quality stream over the WLAN path to devices, while the IoRL network transmits the original, higher quality stream.

This approach is ideal for mission-critical applications. For instance, it ensures a reliable connection for surveillance cameras in airports and parking garages, where people and vehicles block signal paths.

Locate Devices and People with Accuracy as High as 10 cm

IoRL is particularly useful for location-based applications in environments where traditional RF technologies struggle or are unacceptable. Two examples are hospitals and oil/gas facilities, which often restrict the use of cellular, WiFi, and other wireless technologies for safety reasons. These facilities often have architectural features such as steel and lead shielding that block signals.

IoRL sidesteps those challenges by using both visible light and mmWave signals to locate a device, including ones worn by a person, such as a patient or employee. As Figure 3 illustrates, the LEDs transmit light reference signals on specific sub-carriers that are received by sensors such as photodiodes, which are inexpensive to source and install because they’re based on existing illumination technologies, and use the Received Signal Strength at the photo diode receiver to estimate distance travelled. If this process is repeated by three or more RRLH LEDs, then the position of the User Equipment can be estimated by triangulation. If the environment permits the use of RF, too, the addition of mmWave-enabled location technology can pinpoint a device in an area smaller than 10 cm, which is significantly more granular than alternatives such as cellular. Sounding Reference Signals (SRSs) are sent by all user equipment in the room coverage area on specific 5G Subcarriers to specific mmWave RRLHs and the Time Difference of Arrivals measured and used to estimate distance travelled.  If this process is repeated for three of more mmWave RRLH then the position of the User Equipment can also be estimated by triangulation.

Figure 3. VLC-based Indoor Positioning System, location estimation diagram.

IoRL also has several inherent security features. For example, the IHIPG supports security monitoring and management tools, and the highly granular location accuracy makes it fast and easy to find rogue and malicious devices.  

These and other capabilities make IoRL an ideal, much-needed alternative to traditional wired and wireless technologies for providing fast, low-latency, secure, reliable, and seamless broadband in buildings and enclosed spaces such as aircraft, trains, and road vehicles. In the process, IoRL is uniquely positioned to meet the insatiable demand among consumers and businesses for ubiquitous indoor connectivity.